Making News

New System More Accurately Estimates Vineyard Crop Yields

August 06, 2019
A company is developing a computer vision system to estimate vineyard crop yield with the collaboration of UC Davis scientists. On Friday, Nathan Strong, president and chief executive officer at Terroir AI in Menlo Park, demonstrated the system at UC Davis’ Oakville Station. Strong installed a box containing four sensor cameras in the back of the station’s ATV, the cameras adjusted for the high-wire trellis system of the experimental block.

Student Profile: Ph.D. student Jordan Beaver

July 29, 2019

Jordan Beaver is a fourth-year Ph.D. student in the Agricultural and Environmental Chemistry Graduate Group at UC Davis. Growing up in Rock Hill, South Carolina, Jordan developed a love for the outdoors, including camping, hiking, rock climbing, and canoeing, as well as a deep appreciation for Southern BBQ.

Student Profile: PhD candidate Mackenzie Batali

July 29, 2019

Mackenzie Batali has finished the second year of graduate study at UC Davis, on track to achieve her PhD.  Born and raised in Seattle in a restaurant family, she received her bachelors degree in chemistry from Lewis and Clark College with an honors thesis focusing in organic sythesis of resveratrol analogues for use in medical devices. 

Machines Poised To Replace Vineyard Workers Ahmad Hakim July 23, 2019
One of the greatest expenses of making wine is the cost of people. Much of the work in picking wine grapes, or really any fruit, is the cost of doing the work by hand. Many hands are required. For now, that is; inventors continue to tweak designs for machines that can prune and pick in the vineyards and orchards. The Viticulture & Enology program at the University of California-Davis is involved in the transition, as is the UC's Division of Agriculture and Natural Resources. Kaan Kurtural of UCD visits with George Zhuang of UCANR .

Parting words from Dr. Carl Winter

June 27, 2019

Dr. Carl Winter, Specialist in Cooperative Extension and Vice Chair of this Department, is retiring from UC Davis at the end of June, 2019 after 28 years with the UC Davis Department of Food Science and Technology, and 32 years with the University of California. 

UCD team wins 2nd place in Ocean Spray Student Product Development Competition

June 12, 2019

Congratulations to the UC Davis FST team who received second place in the 2019 Ocean Spray Product Development competition!

The team was led by Melvinna Tania, and includes Olga Lawrence, Mary-Ann Chen, Tonya Xie, and Bryan Magaline.  They created their product, Cranwich: bite-sized cookies, naturally flavored and dyed pink with cranberry concentrate.  The cookies sandwich a filling made from real whole cranberries, chia seeds, and agave nectar. 

FST doctoral student wins Danone national fellowship

May 24, 2019

Congratulations are in order for Nick Jensen, a doctoral student in the Mills lab (Micro Grad Group), who just was recently a national fellowship for $25K from Danone North America.

The fellowship was designed for full-time graduate students in the United States. To be eligible, students had to be US citizens and remain in good standing with their university. 

UC Davis Winemaker Chik Brenneman Retired March 5, 2019

May 23, 2019

University of California, Davis (UC Davis) winemaker Charles “Chik” Brenneman retired from his position at the UC Davis Teaching and Research Winery on March 5, 2019 to pursue other winemaking opportunities and to have more time for personal interests. Brenneman joined the Department of Viticulture and Enology (V&E) as staff winemaker in 2006, when the department offices and teaching winery were still located in Wickson Hall on the UC Davis campus.

Course Profile: VEN 126 Wine Stability with Dr. Ron Runnebaum

May 21, 2019

The Wine Stability course (VEN 126) addresses the most important physical, chemical and enzymatic reactions in juices and wines as well as the theory and principles associated with adjustment of acidity, fining, stabilization for shipping and clarification of wines.  The course provides the scientific basis and a quantitative perspective of our understanding of the physical and chemical reactions in wines, besides the ethanol and malolactic fermentations.

By the completion of this class, the student should be able to: